HOME

YOUR SPENDING
Air travel
Credit cards
Health insurance
Inflation
Interest rates
Mortgages
Taxes
Utilities

YOUR ASSETS
Cars & gas
Cash
Home values
Investments
Jobs

YOUR FUTURE 401(k) plans
Career strategy
College costs
Life insurance
Retirement
Social Security

GOOD NEWS
BAD NEWS
SCAMS
EXPERT TALK

EDITORIAL

WHY THIS SITE

YOUR FUTURE

CAREER STRATEGY

The limits of loyalty

>> A FinancialThreats.com Opinion: Your parents may have found it pays to be loyal to their employer. That was then. Now all loyalty is strictly conditional. Thousands of decades-old companies, big and small, have already gone bankrupt; more are on the way.

Even apart from the recession, things are too loose, too fragile, too fast-moving to plan on working for the same company for a decade or more. Instead, think bigger. As you plan your career, be less concerned about what your current employer wants and more concerned about what your industry wants—and rewards. Take this kind of thinking down to specific skills. If you’re a software engineer, for example, and you learn that the market wants people with experience in Web applications, find a way to get that experience, even if it means taking night courses.

This approach will also affect the kind of the kind of training and experience you try to get from your current employer. It could even lead to leaving your company for a lower salary if you think the new job will set you on a better career path. Helpful websites include: www.careercounseling.com and www.careerplanner.com

Self-defense: Keep up to date with what your industry wants. Then do whatever you have to do to get that kind of experience. Realize that your future lies with your industry, not just your current employer.

 

Work for your industry, not just your company.

 

HOME | ABOUT US | LEGAL DISCLAIMER | TERMS OF USE | PRIVACY | CONTACT US
Copyright © 2009 Richard Evans and Andrew Bromberg